m e g g a n  g o u l d

 
 
Bureau of Visual Instruction
 
Surface tension
   Vol 1: Blackboards etc
   Vol 2: Verso
   Vol 3: Screenshots
   Vol 4: Viewfinders
   Vol 5: iPad
 
Site-seeing
   Vol 1: Attention
   Vol 2: Distraction
   Vol 3: Go ogle
 
Other
   Workspaces
   Crows
   Catch-all/Small Moments
 
 
 
Bio & News
Contact

 

 

Artist Statement

Considerations of vision—of how we look at the world at large, as well as how we customarily employ photography to document and speak to our surroundings—have long been central to my interests within photography. In various series of photographs, I have explored and questioned conventions of photographic vision, employing dichotomies between virtuality and physicality, stasis and movement, and strict and fortuitous framings, with techniques ranging from digital pinhole cameras to code-generated photographs of internet imagery, in an ongoing quest to push the boundaries of the photographic image. What do we look at photographically, and what do we ignore? How does the camera both free and constrain our vision?

Much of my work relies on the typological impulse of the large format camera to carefully examine several distinct arenas of contemporary vision. I am particularly drawn to the surface value of mundane, framed spaces: blackboards, computer screens, and the backs of photographs have served as starting points. These surfaces, consistently rendered valuable/visible primarily through the introduction of text, are pre-framed picture spaces both ubiquitous and resonant within our daily realities—revealing, but rarely imaged. I am fascinated with how we frame spaces, both in-camera and in the world at large, and, similarly, how we curate what takes place within the resultant rectangular forms. Most recently, I have been looking at the camera itself, separating the viewfinder’s quirks from the world beyond and examining how these glass and plastic forms inform and shape our photographic visions.